Researchers have long studied the factors that can make marriages last longer. Studies have begun to zero in on education as one of the main contributors to a lasting marriage. Couples where both have a college degree have a higher percentage of remaining married for longer in an age where marriage and divorce rates are declining in general.

Going to college and receiving more education has the benefit of pushing marriage to later in life. This means that the spouses are both more mature and established. The extra time helps them learn more about what they want in a partner and build their own resources, leading to fewer arguments over money. Conflicts over finances are one of the leading causes of divorce in the U.S.

This trend is felt particularly by women who have only a high school diploma. They are statistically twice as likely to be divorced as women with a college education. Perhaps this is because of the division of household labor or general dissatisfaction with the equity in the marriage. When the couple has a disparate level of education between them, there is a higher statistical chance of a divorce. The marriage with the best chance of surviving is one where both spouses have a college degree.

Those who are in the midst of a divorce and are concerned about their future economic outlook due to a disparity in earning power between them and their spouse may consult with a family law attorney. The spouse who earns less does not have to be doomed to inferior economic circumstances solely by virtue of their level of education and their job. The divorce laws may provide them with a certain level of protection to aid in their post-divorce life.